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LVVTA Certification - Page 7
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  1. #61
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    In our last email update, we told you about a number of changes we were working on to improve the Low Volume Vehicle (LVV) system. Those changes have now been completed and further information about them follows. This update also contains information about work underway to provide alternative pathways to LVV certification for lower-risk modifications. Please find following some questions and answers - we’ve also added these to our website so the latest information is available to everyone.
    We’ll contact you soon with further updates about the review. We’ll only contact you when we have something new to say, and anticipate this won’t be for a few weeks.
    What has happened since the last update?
    Since we last updated you in May 2016, we have finalised the following actions:
    Improving certifier consistency:
    • The Low Volume Vehicle Technical Association (LVVTA) has completed an update of all standards so there is a single, up-to-date source of information for both certifiers and modifiers. As a result, certifiers will need to rely less on instructions issued via LVVTA information sheets, and customers will find it easier to locate information on requirements and will experience more consistent interpretation and application of standards by certifiers. The latest versions of all standards are available in the Documents section of the LVVTA’s website.
    • Although there will always be a level of interpretation and individual decision-making exercised by certifiers, it’s important that certifiers can see where their decision-making may be out of step with other certifiers. To achieve this, the LVVTA has established a certifier Community of Practice, and the first meeting was held in Auckland on 26 June. The next meeting is planned for 13 September, and future meetings will occur around every two months.
    • We have ensured there will be an increased focus on consistency in the LVVTA’s certifier training – using the results of form set audits and common queries to identify individual and group training needs – and more opportunities within the training for certifiers to share with and learn from others, through case studies and group discussion of challenging cases.
    • The LVVTA has formalised a new requirement for LVV certifiers to ‘co-certify’ (with another certifier) at least one vehicle per year, by adding this to the Operating Requirements Schedule (ORS).
    • We have increased the frequency of auditing of certifiers carried out by our Certification Officers, to further ensure high standards are being maintained.
    • The LVVTA is continuing to research options and approaches for making the Hobby Car Technical Manual available online. We expect the manual to be published online by the end of October 2016, and it will be renamed.
    Tailoring certification processes to risk
    Together with the LVVTA, we consulted with certifiers and modifiers on short-term options for tailoring LVV certification to risk. As a result of the feedback we received, the LVVTA has:
    • changed the certification process so that low-risk (‘below threshold’) modifications are excluded from LVV certification when more significant modifications are being certified
    • increased the range of modifications that can be certified by different categories of LVV certifiers, which has increased the number of potential certifiers available for most types of certification, and
    • excluded brake-testing from certain LVV certifications where it is not relevant to the modifications that have been made.
    The result of these changes is that the time and complexity of some certifications will be reduced, as fewer items will need to be tested, and customers will find it easier to find a certifier for their vehicle.
    The LVV Code and ORS have been updated to reflect the changes above, and LVV certifiers are currently receiving training on all these aspects.
    Reviewing roles, functions and performance metrics
    We’ve completed a review of the roles and functions of the various parties to the LVV system, and strengthened these where necessary to support good performance of the system. Some of the changes made include:
    • formalising and documenting the LVVTA process for regularly updating the LVV Standards and Code
    • reinstating regular formal meetings of the LVVTA-Transport Agency Policy Working Group
    • confirming and clarifying the LVVTA’s processes for reporting on certifier performance, and
    • formalising the Transport Agency’s annual auditing and review of LVVTA.
    What work is happening now?
    We’re currently working on further ways to tailor certification to risk, and are working with the LVVTA and industry to develop streamlining options. Our work focuses on vehicles that are currently required to undergo LVV certification, but are lower risk because:
    • they’ve been produced in a commercial, production-based setting with quality controls in place, or
    • they’ve already met appropriate standards overseas.
    The options we’re working on are:
    • creating a commercial sub-committee of the LVVTA’s Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to enable quicker decision-making on approvals for innovative commercial designs
    • allowing some modified vehicles imported from other countries to be exempted from LVV certification in New Zealand, if they’ve already met appropriate standards overseas, and
    • providing an alternative way for commercial modifiers to achieve LVV certification for production-based vehicle modifications (sometimes referred to as ‘type certification’).
    Once implemented, these changes will streamline certification processes and make it quicker and easier to get lower-risk modifications certified, creating benefits for commercial modifiers and importers of modified vehicles. We will consult key parties on the detailed changes in early September, and use their feedback to help refine the new processes. This consultation will include inviting members of this distribution list to provide their views, so you will receive more detailed information about the proposed changes soon. We expect the first of these new processes to be implemented in October and will gradually roll out further changes as they’re developed.
    Why weren’t more tailored certification options rolled out sooner?
    The options we’re considering represent more significant change to the LVV system than the short-term tailoring options that have already been implemented. They require us to consult and work closely with the LVVTA, LVV certifiers, and industry members to ensure they are implemented effectively. The LVV system is complex, both in terms of the way the sector is regulated and the legislation that supports it. We want to make sustainable changes, so taking a collaborative, considered approach is critical.
    What’s happening next?
    Through October, we’ll continue to work towards implementing further options for tailored certification described above. Once the changes have been implemented we’ll take stock of the improvements made, and consider whether any further changes are required to improve the functioning of the LVV system.

  2. #62
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    Default Imho

    Isn't this an awesome newsletter? Something to think about;

    The bureaucracy has taken hold nicely. What was initially a very simple process has become complex and regulation bound. Regulations on regulations, and no one prepared to advise or make any decisions. "Got to cover my arse" they say.

    The Technical Committee is expanding nicely, we now have a sub committee for some nefarious function, and no doubt the future holds more sub committees, all meeting regularly and extracting a fee for the inestimably good service and advice.

    Meanwhile, costs continue to rise. This is, of course, what happens when a bureaucracy expands, it needs to collect more money to feed itself. This needs to be carefully managed. Sometimes, bureaucracies expand too fast, fees (indirect taxes) climb and people who have a choice decide not to have anything to do with it because its too expensive. The activity the bureaucracy set itself up to manage goes into decline and the income drops off. We could be at that stage now with the LVVTA. Notice how the more "commercial" manufacturers are getting the deal sweetened up while the poor old Garage Dave the home builder gets swamped under a pile of bewildering regulations and fees from eager certifiers to whom old Dave constitutes a captive market

    I think it could be time to re think the old "if we haven't got the LVVTA then we haven't got a hobby and sport" attitude.That has been used as a rationale and even as a threat in the past, but perhaps its time to take another look at the whole thing. Perhaps the direction this thing is going in is not a good thing for our sport and hobby any more, rather its become a good thing for itself and its employees and contractors who make money from it.

    It may well be that the original concept of the LVVTA was a good one, and that the people who kicked it off were sincere in wanting to protect our sport and hobby, but things appear to have gotten out of control to the point where the very rights and freedoms the founders set out to preserve have now become in danger of being compromised by it.
    Honour is a man's gift to himself

  3. #63
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    I thought to stimulate some exchange of ideas here. Let me throw another few ideas out and see if there is some discussion.

    The LVVTA came about as providing an organisation whereby we could enjoy our hobby/sport without excessive encumbrance by legislative authorities like LTA who were unsuited and disinclined to put resource into a comparatively small market segment. The LVVTA filled the need for an organisation to assure the public safety as far as Hot Rod type vehicles on the public roads go, while not unduly using resource from the LTA. And then along came the MANZ, the Rally Cars, the Specialty Cars and the 4WD Enthusiasts. All welcome, cried the LVVTA, the more the merrier. And it all growed like the proverbial topsy.

    The LVVTA, while an Incorporated Society, has thusly become a business that caters for a wide range of vehicles that do not fall within the LTA sphere. As such it has effectively become a subset of the greater Government Department which is its parent. All fair enough, however we have come a long way from the original concept, that of a self governing regulatory assurance body for the NZHRA.

    Once upon a time we had the NZHRA, the Hobby Car Manual appeared, and the certifiers started up. For a reasonable sum in certifier fees we could get vehicles certified and road legal. Now, for the end user, the garage builder and club member, the process has become a very expensive one. My own build is on track for the best part of $2600 when all is done, and I have heard of far greater sums from those being tended by less reasonable certifiers. The Hobby Car Manual has been jettisoned by the LVVTA and we now have a Government type system whereby there is no definitive reference as to what is legal and what isn't. We are obliged to pay for someone's opinion, none of those someones being Chartered Engineers, by the way.

    "Our" NZHRA now owns the HCTM, a great reference source and one still respected by at least two people in the LTA I have spoken to. There is no reason why, as the NZHRA, we could not form our own certifying body which would form a service, rather than a parasitic bureaucracy, for our own members. We already are entrusted to administer the Fender Exemption process and we have been seen to administer this in a responsible manner. This would enable us to take back the ability to plot our own destiny and return to the original concept of a service for Rodders by Rodders themselves as NZHRA members.
    Honour is a man's gift to himself

  4. #64
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    ...Hi Rodbolt,
    Your comments are fairly close to the mark,,(except for the HCTM is now owned by LVVTA. not NZHRA) there is a resource issue which is causing problems for us hot rodders who by the way account for only 5% of LVVTA certs. The problem is that without the commercial certification work there's not enough base platform for a hot rod only cert system to be financially viable and sustainable...the big commercial modifiers (van seats etc) are hogging the resource needed to make it good for us...something LVVTA are acutely aware of and would dearly love to resolve.

  5. #65
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    Default Tailoring the Low Volume Vehicle certification process to risk

    Tailoring the Low Volume Vehicle certification processto risk

    Overview

    The NZ Transport Agency is proposing some changes to theexisting Low Volume Vehicle (LVV) certification process, in order to streamlinethe process for lower-risk modifications. The proposed changes focus onvehicles that are currently required to undergo LVV certification, but arelower risk because:
    · they’ve been produced in a commercial, production-basedsetting with quality controls in place, or
    · they’ve already met appropriate overseas standards.

    The proposed changes include:
    · providing an alternative way for commercial modifiers toachieve LVV certification for production-based vehicle modifications (sometimesreferred to as ‘type certification’), and
    · allowing some imported modified vehicles to be excluded fromLVV certification in New Zealand, if they’ve already met appropriate standardsoverseas.

    We’d appreciate your feedback on the proposed changes. Thisdocument addresses the proposed changes for vehicles that have already met appropriate overseas standards; we’llbe seeking feedback separately on the type certification proposal.

    Our intention is that, once implemented, the proposed changeswill make it quicker and easier to get lower-risk modifications certified,creating benefits for commercial modifiers and importers of modified vehicles.

    Context of theproposed changes

    The LVV certification system for scratch-built or modifiedvehicles has been in place since 1992. Recent customer feedback and experienceshave prompted us to review the system to ensure it’s still fit for purpose, andto look for ways it could be improved.

    We want the LVV system to be responsive toinnovation, efficient and transparent. The system must uphold the safety ofroad users, while also providing a positive user experience for customers of thecertification process. Feedback from thecommercial sector dealing with low volume vehicles has suggested we could makeimprovements to the system to make it more suitable for them, encouraginginnovation and economic growth.

    Aspart of our review of the LVV system, we’re seeking to develop and implement tailored certification processes that reflect the risks associated withdifferent types of modifications and the contexts of different type ofmodifiers.




    Imported modified vehicles

    1.
    1.1 Why we’reproposing change
    All vehicles imported into New Zealand are inspected by entry certifiersbefore being issued a Warrant of Fitness (WoF) and registration to operate onNew Zealand roads. This includes a check to confirm if the vehicle has had anymodifications made to it after being produced by the originalmanufacturer. At present, if anypost-production modifications are identified by the entry certifier, thevehicle must be further inspected by a Low Volume Vehicle (LVV) certifier to confirm that it complies with New Zealand’s standards for modified vehicles.This requirement is applied to all imported modified vehicles, regardless ofany testing or approvals that may have been issued in the country it wasmodified in.
    There are several overseas authorities that issue approvals tomodified vehicles to confirm those vehicles have been inspected and/or testedand found to meet the required standards in their country. Often thesestandards are comparable to (or in some cases higher than) New Zealand’sstandards. In many cases, the vehicles are modified in significant numbers infactory settings similar to those of original manufacturers.
    Where such approvals have been issued by an overseas authoritywith comparable standards to our own, we think it shouldn’t be necessary torequire further proof of vehicle safety by requiring LVV certification in NewZealand. In these cases, LVV certification adds cost and complexity to the importingprocess. We’re therefore proposing a process where the LVV certification requirement is removed from the entry process for vehicles that have beenapproved by certain overseas authorities.
    1.2 Thechanges being proposed
    Under the proposed process, all imported vehicles will continue to go through the entry certification process. If a modification is found to have been made after original manufacture and the vehicle’s documentation includes appropriate confirmation from an approved overseas authority that the modifications meet overseas standards, the vehicle will no longer be required to undergo LVV certification. A WoF and registration will be issued and the vehicle will be able to be used on New Zealand roads. No LVV plate will need to be attached to the vehicle, and an LVV certifier will not be involved in the process.

    If a vehicle with modifications is imported from an overseas authority that has not been approved, or the importer cannot provide documentation to show that it has been approved to an acceptable standard overseas, the vehicle will still be required to undergo LVV certification, and follow the existing process.

    A diagram showing the proposedprocess can be found on the next page.


    Diagram 1: Overview of the proposedprocess for importing modified vehicles

    Key changes being proposed:
    1. Imported modified vehicles with approval from specified overseas authorities will not be required to go through LVV certification in New Zealand. These vehicles will essentially be treated in the same way as imported production vehicles, which have also shown compliance with relevant standards in their country of origin.
    2. Entry certifiers will check for approval from specified overseas authorities as part of their entry inspection check for whether specialist certification Is required.
    3. Because these vehicles are not required to go through LVV certification, an LVV certifier will not be involved, and an LVV plate will not be issued.

    1.3 Specifiedoverseas authorities and approvals
    Underthe proposed approach, overseas approvals will be added incrementally as we areable to research and approve them. The first overseas approval we proposeaccepting is European Community Whole Vehicle Type Approval (ECWVTA).
    TheECWVTA framework governs the safety of vehicles in the European Community andis designed to cover a range of vehicle types, including series productionvehicles and those that have been commercially modified. ECWVTA is a typeapproval system that involves independent testing and certification carried outby ‘technical services’ and ‘approval authorities’ approved by each memberstate. Technical services (normally commercial organisations such as Germany’s TechnicalInspection Association [Technischer Überwachungsverein orTUV]) carry out testing and manufacturing plant audits and preparedocuments. Approval authorities are government departments (such as the German FederalMotor Transport Authority [Kraftfahrt-Bundesamtor KBA]) who have overall responsibility for the process and grant the formalapproval.
    Giventhe widespread acceptance of ECWVTA, and because it is based on technicalstandards already accepted under New Zealand law, there is good reason tobelieve it would produce vehicles that are safe and appropriate for use in thiscountry.
    We arealso researching the Japanese approval system to identify opportunities toapply the proposed process to vehicles imported from Japan. Currently vehiclesimported from Japan with a Type Designation Number (TDN) are not required to gothrough LVV certification when entering New Zealand, but there may be othertypes of Japanese approval that could also be accepted. We expect this to bethe second jurisdiction to which the proposed process could be applied.
    Overtime we will also consider other jurisdictions such as Australia, the UnitedStates and individual countries from within Europe, and approve them ifappropriate.
    1.4 Benefitsof the proposed change
    Thebenefits of allowing imported modified vehicles with recognised overseasapproval to be excluded from LVV certification are:
    · entry processrequirements are more clearly matched to need
    · importers needonly deal with one inspection process and one inspector – thereby reducing thetime, cost and complexity of importing certain modified vehicles
    · modifiedvehicles can get to market quickly.
    1.5 Maintainingsafety
    It’s important that the safety standards of vehicles on New Zealand roads are not reduced by any changes. The proposed changes will ensuresafety standards are maintained, because evidence will be required to show thatthe imported vehicle has already met comparable safety standards in anothercountry. If this evidence is not supplied, the vehicle will be required toundergo LVV certification.
    Given the widespread acceptance of ECWVTA, and because it is based on technical standards already accepted under New Zealand law, there isgood reason to believe it would produce vehicles that are safe and appropriatefor use in this country.
    Under ECWVTA,modified vehicles are required to comply to the greatest extent possible with the same standards applicable to full volume production vehicles. For the key standards (which are also those required by New Zealand law), full compliance – that is, full independent testing and certification - is required.This means that for many systems and components, multi-stage or modified vehicles are effectively the same as compliant full production vehicles.
    The overseas authorities whose approvals we expect to accept under the proposed system are ones that have robust systems for setting vehicle standards, a well-established motor vehicle industry, and robust processes fortesting and inspecting vehicles to ensure they meet standards.
    Where a vehicle has already met recognised standards that are comparable to New Zealand’s, there should be no increased risk to removingthe requirement for LVV certification.

    What are we seeking your feedback on?

    The Transport Agency welcomes your comments on the proposed changes setout in this document.
    The proposals focus on changes to LVV certification requirements incertain situations and envisage new processes.

    When you provide your feedback, it would be helpful if you would considerand comment on the following:

    · What impact would the proposals have, and onwhom? The Transport Agency is particularly interested in your comments on costsin implementing the proposals.
    · Would any groups or individuals be disadvantagedby the proposals, and how?
    · Would any groups or individuals benefit from theproposals, and how?
    · Are there any implementation or complianceissues you would like to raise?

    It would also be helpful if you could provide examples to illustrate pointsmade.

    Giving your feedback

    Please include the following information:
    · the title of this document
    · your name, and title if applicable
    · your organisation’s name if applicable
    · your email and postal address.

    Please send your comments by one of the following methods.
    By email to: lvreview@nzta.govt.nz
    By post to:
    LVV Review
    Technical Services
    NZ Transport Agency
    Private Bag 6995
    WELLINGTON 6141


    Please note the deadline for comments is 5pm on Friday 23 September.

    Your comments are publicinformation

    Please note that the Transport Agency may publish any information thatyou provide, and may identify you should it publish your comments or provide it to a third party.

    Please indicate clearly,therefore, if your comments are commercially sensitive or if, for some otherreason, they should not be di
    Last edited by Admin; 09-13-2016 at 03:12 PM.

  6. #66
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    Default

    Low Volume Vehicle (LVV) Review


    Exempting approved imported modified vehicles fromLVV certification

    Questions andAnswers

    What changes are being proposed?

    The proposed change would allow vehiclesthat have been modified overseas to be exempt from the LVV certificationrequirement for entry into New Zealand, if there is evidence that the vehiclehas met comparable standards overseas.
    Under the proposal, a step will beadded to the entry certification process to verify any overseas approval ofmodifications, before deciding if the vehicle needs to be LVV certified.
    If there is evidence that thevehicle’s modifications have met comparable standards overseas, the vehiclewill not be referred for LVV certification, and an LVV plate will not beattached to the vehicle.
    Why are these changes being proposed?

    Many technical standards from overseas jurisdictionsare already accepted under New Zealand law for production vehicles. In order tomore clearly match entry process requirements to need, we have identified thatmodified vehicles that have been proven to meet these standards should nolonger require LVV certification.
    We believe that removing thisrequirement will make it easier and more cost effective for modified vehiclesof a high standard to be imported into New Zealand, increasing accessibility tospecial vehicles required by businesses and private citizens.
    What vehicle types do the proposed changes apply to?

    The LVV certification system appliesonly to light vehicles (those with a gross vehicle mass [GVM] of less than 3500kg). Therefore the proposed changes apply to the importation of light vehiclessuch as light campervans, hearses and wheelchair-accessible vehicles. They donot apply to heavy vehicles, including campervans with a GVM of 3500 kg or greater.
    Which countries or jurisdictions are you considering exempting from LVVcertification?

    Thefirst overseas approval we propose accepting is European Community WholeVehicle Type Approval (ECWVTA). We are also researching the Japanese approvalsystem to identify opportunities to apply the proposed new process to vehiclesimported from Japan.
    Overtime we will also consider other jurisdictions such as Australia, the UnitedStates, and individual countries from within Europe, and approve them ifappropriate.
    How will you decide if an overseas jurisdiction’s approval is acceptable?

    We willresearch and consider both the vehicle standards required by law in the countryor jurisdiction, and the process by which approvals are issued. We willconsider the overseas approval to be acceptable if we are satisfied that:
    a) the legal vehicle standards are comparable to New Zealand’s, orare already accepted in New Zealand, and
    b) the process by which the vehicle is inspected, tested and approvedis consistent and well-documented.
    What if all modifications on the vehicle aren’tcovered by the overseas approval?

    In some cases, there may berequirements in the New Zealand LVV system that are not explicitly covered bythe overseas approval. In these cases, we may require additional documentationas evidence of compliance.
    For example, the LVV systemcontains requirements for the safety of wheelchair hoists and ramps. There areno corresponding requirements in the ECWVTA, but there is a separaterequirement for machinery, including wheelchair hoists fitted to vehicles. Wemay therefore require an additional Declaration of Conformity for thewheelchair hoist in addition to the ECWVTA documentation, to fully confirm thevehicle’s compliance with comparable standards.
    When are these changes expected to be in place?

    We expect the new process to be inplace, using ECWVTA and Japanese approvals, by 31 October 2016. As we continue to research and approve otherjurisdictions we will add these to the process over time.
    Where can I get more information?

    If you would like further information about the proposedchanges, or the LVV certification review in general, please email lvreview@nzta.govt.nz, or visit the LVVcertification review section of our website.

  7. #67
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    Default Type Certification proposed


    Good afternoon

    Last week we sent you a discussion document about ourproposed change to the process for imported modified vehicles, and advised youthat we would be sending you a second proposal about type certification. Please find attached a discussion document and some Questions andAnswers, which relate to type certification. We welcome your feedback onthe proposal in the discussion document.

    Please note the closing date for providing your feedback onthe attached document is 5pm on Friday 30 September.





    Tailoring the Low Volume Vehicle Certification process to risk


    Discussion document 2: Allowing typecertification for commercial modifiers

    The NZ Transport Agency would appreciate your feedback on aproposed change to the Low Volume Vehicle (LVV) certification process, which will apply to commercial vehicle modifiers who carry out the same modifications to a number of vehicles (commonly called ‘series production’). We’re also seeking feedback separately on a proposal for vehicles that have already met appropriate overseas standards, and we released a discussion document on that proposal on 9 September 2016.
    Overview

    The Transport Agency is proposing some changes to the existing LVV certification process, in order to streamline the process for lower-risk modifications. The proposed changes focus on vehicles that are currently required to undergo individual LVV certification, but are lower risk because:
    · they’ve been produced in a commercial, production-based setting with quality controls in place, or
    · they’ve already met appropriate overseas standards.

    The proposed changes include:
    · providing an alternative way for commercial modifiers to achieve LVV certification for series production-based vehicle modifications (sometimes referred to as ‘type certification’), and
    · allowing some imported modified vehicles to be excluded from LVV certification in New Zealand, if they’ve already met appropriate standards overseas.

    Our intention is that, once implemented, the proposed changes will make it quicker and easier to get lower-risk modifications certified, creating benefits for commercial modifiers and importers of modified vehicles.

    Context of theproposed changes

    The LVV certification system for scratch-built or modified vehicles has been in place since 1992. Recent customer feedback and experiences have prompted us to review the system to ensure it’s still fit for purpose, and to look for ways it could be improved.

    We want the LVV system to be responsive to innovation, efficient and transparent. The system must uphold the safety ofroad users, while also providing a positive user experience for customers of the certification process. Feedback from the commercial sector dealing with low volume vehicles has suggested we could make improvements to the system to make it more suitable for them, encouraging innovation and economic growth without compromising on safety.

    As partof our review of the LVV system, we’re seeking to develop and implementtailored certification processes that reflect the risks associated withdifferent types of modifications and the contexts of different type ofmodifiers.
    Type certification for commercial, production-basedvehicle modifications

    1.1 Why we’re proposing change
    The LVV system applies to all modified or scratch-built vehicles produced in volumes of less than 500 per year, regardless of the process used or the quality controls in place for the modifications. The system applies equally to both hobbyist and commercial vehicle modifiers.
    Feedback from the modification industry has suggested that the current system, while appropriate for scratch-built and individually modified vehicles, is less suitable for the commercial modification environment. Currently,to achieve certification, all stages of modification must be sighted by an LVV certifier who then certifies the vehicles at the end of production. Costs for commercial modifiers can therefore accumulate significantly and there can be delays in the process while an LVV certifier is commissioned to undertake inspections.
    Many vehicles commercially modified in New Zealand are modified in a factory-like setting, with strict processes and good quality controls in place, and are often built in a ‘series’ where multiple vehicles are built to the same design and process. As a result, they present a lower risk than individually-produced ‘one-off’ modifications. We are therefore proposing to provide an alternative method of obtaining certification for vehicles modified in these settings..
    1.2 The changes being proposed
    The proposed process will allow approved commercial modifiers to obtain a ‘type-approval’ that will allow them to certify vehicles as being produced toa pre-approved design. The modifier will produce a design and modify a vehicle according to that design. An LVV certifier will certify the first vehicle produced and confirm that it meets the LVV Code; this may include seeking guidance from the Low Volume Vehicle Technical Association (LVVTA) Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), as per the existing process. The certification of the first vehicle will also act as an approval of the modifier’s design.
    On receipt of the certification documents, the LVVTA will assign atype-approval number. Subsequent vehicles built using the same design andprocess will then be able to be certified by that modifier. Modifiers will beable to pre-order LVV plates, quoting the type-approval number, to further speed up the process of getting vehicles to market.
    In order to be eligible to certify their own vehicles, modifierswill need to meet a set of criteria including:
    · having are cognised Quality Management System (QMS) in place, which is externally audited and adhered to,
    · holding adequate public liability and professional indemnity insurance,
    · the Transport Agency’s existing ‘fit and proper person’ requirements, and
    · being auditedregularly by the Transport Agency.
    Modifiers will also need to keep production records of all vehicles they modify, confirming at key steps of the build process that each vehicle conforms to the approved design.
    Once the modification has been completed, the modifier will signoff each finished vehicle as fully complying with the approved design. Once the vehicle is signed off, the pre-ordered plate can be affixed to the vehicle by the modifier.
    Key changes being proposed:
    1. A qualifying commercial modifier is appointed bythe Transport Agency as an entity which can certify their own vehicles, providedthat they have been built exactly to a type-approved design.
    2. An LVV certifier will certify the first vehicleproduced.
    3. LVVTA will approve the design for use onsubsequent vehicles and issue a type-approval number.
    4. An LVV certifier will no longer be required tocertify subsequent vehicles built to the type-approved design.



    Last edited by Admin; 09-15-2016 at 06:57 PM.

  8. #68
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Admin View Post
    ...Hi Rodbolt,
    Your comments are fairly close to the mark,,(except for the HCTM is now owned by LVVTA. not NZHRA) there is a resource issue which is causing problems for us hot rodders who by the way account for only 5% of LVVTA certs. The problem is that without the commercial certification work there's not enough base platform for a hot rod only cert system to be financially viable and sustainable...the big commercial modifiers (van seats etc) are hogging the resource needed to make it good for us...something LVVTA are acutely aware of and would dearly love to resolve.
    Cheers Paul, I hereby stand corrected on ownership of the HCTM.

    I didn't realise "we" accounted for only 5% of the LVVTA certs.And probably a lot less than 5% in $ value.So from a business plan point of view, "we" are a very insignificant part of the LVVTA client base. Frightening to contemplate the possible outcomes from that one.
    Honour is a man's gift to himself

  9. #69
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    Default cert plate costs ....

    Quote Originally Posted by Rodbolt View Post
    Cheers Paul, I hereby stand corrected on ownership of the HCTM.

    I didn't realise "we" accounted for only 5% of the LVVTA certs.And probably a lot less than 5% in $ value.So from a business plan point of view, "we" are a very insignificant part of the LVVTA client base. Frightening to contemplate the possible outcomes from that one.

    Rodbolt.. as you've said .. ive heard of a couple of cars cert at $4000.00 (nelson area) does this mean our 5% is making up for what we don't equal in percentage?..

    what disturbs me is there are so many individual opinions on how to translate the cert process. .. ive heard tell of people bouncing from one certifier to the next only to find the previous cert work that has been ok'd (now is no longer valid at the next certifier and needs to be redone) -- who maybe cheaper or has an "more experienced" opinion ..

    there is a lot of wringing hands as the clear boundries set are minced around by various certifiers. there seems to be confusion at what is best practice ..

    ultimately consumer pays.. what could be a fun hobby or sport for father and son or the whole family is / has now become elite-ist (YES I SAID IT ! and I don't care) frankly the spend of $4000, is hugely off putting for a little aluminium plate ... we as hot rodders need to re-address the realism of cost versus ... or surely as on page 52 January issue NZ Hot Rod mag.. the kiwi past-time will die in the arse

    'Crate ranted

    NZ HOT ROD MAGAZINE.. political content be dammed... 'Rodders need to need to push for a better priced system ...
    we as a collective group need to follow process for safety's sake sure ! but at a reasonable cost as well. !

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